The Cadence of the Year and Lifelong Learning

By September 20, 2018 No Comments
Lifelong Learning TTA Blog

Years have a cadence to how they proceed.  Every year, it’s particularly special when the summer is winding down and the official start of a new school year is ready to begin. From elementary schools to higher education institutions, students are being greeted to a year of learning and collaboration, as they navigate along a new personal development path. All this excitement and trepidation is leading the way to an active and lifetime journey of learning.

This excitement for knowledge is also fostered among recent college graduates who are just stepping into their career.  It’s also true for experienced professionals who continue to develop, foster and share new work experiences. All this revolves around a common theme of learning.

As the new school year starts, the anticipation and desire to learn begins for so many young children, adolescents, and adults that it is important to reflect on the importance of learning — the desire to challenge oneself to new elevations and achievement levels throughout life.

Lifelong learning means that schooling is diverse and is adapted to the individual, and is available throughout our lives.[i] So, what are some of the benefits of seeking a lifetime adventure of learning?

Four Benefits of Lifelong Learning

Consider the following benefits to motivate you to continue your everyday learning journey.[ii]

  • Economic Rewards – There is a link between education and the potential to increase lifetime earnings. In 2015, Christopher Tamborini, ChangHwan Kim, and Arthur Sakamoto found that controlling for other factors, men and women can expect to earn $655,000 and $445,000 more, respectively, during their careers with a bachelor’s degree than with a high school degree, and graduate degrees yield further gains.[iii] Developing new skills and pursuing ongoing professional development also proves to help one be more competitive as the market changes, the economy shifts, and rapid advances in technology are achieved.
  • Lifelong Learning Has a Positive Impact on Our Health – Studies show that reading dramatically reduces stress and learning new skills at an older age can offset cognitive decline and improve memory. Research also suggests that a year of formal education can add more than half a year to a person’s life span.[iv]
  • Curiosity and Happiness – People who are committed to continuous learning grow intellectually, and often possess the key attributes of curiosity and happiness. Also, they are more socially and professionally stimulated and engaged with everyone they interact with.
  • Cornerstone of Human Motivation – We flourish with every success. Hard work, dedication, solving a problem, and overcoming a difficult task, all contribute and provide a sense of fulfillment and purpose in everything we do. The experience is powerful and energizes us as humans. The satisfaction and thrill of learning and accomplishments drive us for the next success.

Dedicate Yourself to Learning and Development

The pursuit of intellectual, professional, and personal development is introduced at a young age but continues throughout our adolescent years (and beyond). It is important to take in our intellectual curiosity and learn every day like we used to do in our adolescent years. Through technology and ease of sharing information, learning is at our fingertips. We just need to remember to take advantage of it every day for our own health, wealth, and mind.

As a new school year begins, remember to continue to embrace and create lifelong learning opportunities for yourself. This excitement in the air is contagious and has extraordinary benefits!

Visit our Soft Skills Training page for more information on developing superior communication skills.



[i] https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1877042812019751

[ii] https://hbr.org/2017/02/lifelong-learning-is-good-for-your-health-your-wallet-and-your-social-life
[iii] https://hbr.org/2017/02/lifelong-learning-is-good-for-your-health-your-wallet-and-your-social-life
[iv] http://www.nber.org/papers/w12352.pdf